The REM Island – August 1972

… mid August 1964 with a radio programme on 1400kHz and TV using Channel E11 (System B). The Dutch authorities took action against the station by passing the REM Law on 12th December 1964, which designated the sea bed under the REM Island as Dutch territory. Five days later Dutch authorities boarded the platform and ended broadcasting. About one year later, Radio Noordzee resumed transmissions legally, on land, as the TROS. Meantime the REM Island itself was abandoned and was for some time used …

1960’s Pirate Radio – Was It Legal?

It’s well known that successive UK governments of the 1960’s were unable to control the offshore “pirate” radio stations until the passing of the Marine Broadcasting (Offences) Act in 1967. What is less well known today is that it was actually illegal for anyone in the UK to listen to the pirate stations because, since the stations were unauthorised/unlicensed, listeners were contravening the UK’s 1949 Wireless Telegraphy Act. The absurdity of prosecuting millions …