Recent Additions To Our Radio Station Archive

Over the last couple of weeks we have added these new items…

1. Manx Radio: Britain’s oldest licensed commercial radio station celebrated their 50th anniversary in 2014. Here are two interviews with their first General Manager, John Grierson, talking about how Manx Radio finally managed to get its license from the U.K. government and their first months on the air.

2. Manx Radio: Chris Williams presents his show dedicated to Radio Caroline’s 50th anniversary on 29th March 2014.

3. WABC New York, N.Y.: 48 minutes with Cousin’ Brucie on one of his morning shows in 1969.

4. Radio Caroline South: Listen again to the “Admiral” Robbie Dale followed by Johnnie Walker on Monday, 28th August 1967, a couple of weeks after the Marine Broadcasting (Offences) Act had become law. 44 minutes.

5. Radio Caroline South Jingles 1968: On 3rd March 1968, both radio Caroline ships “Mi Amigo” and “Caroline”, were seized and towed to Amsterdam by the Wijsmuller salvage company to secure unpaid servicing bills. The Radio Caroline South ship, mv. Mi Amigo, was later sold at auction to Gerard van Dam. Thanks to John Ker, who purchased some of Caroline’s original studio equipment and kindly provided these few remaining jingles and recordings dubbed direct from one of Caroline’s Spotmaster to its Ampex tape recorder. 6-1/2 mins.

6. BBC Radio Four Extra, 20th December 2014: “Here’s Kenny” – Kenny Everett. The story of Kenny Everett’s radio and TV career. Apart from Kenny himself and many of his souvenirs, jingles, promos and clips, this programme includes extracts from pirate Big-L Radio London with contributions from Tony Blackburn and Keith Skues. 61 minutes.

7. BBC Radio Two, Ed Stewart, Junior Choice, 25th December 2014: One of the last voices to be heard on offshore station Big-L Radio London when it closed in August 1967, Ed Stewart was one of the first DJs to join BBC Radio One when it opened six weeks later. Ed Stewart sadly died in January 2016. 117 minutes.

Please Note:
All audio recordings are in .mp3 format within password-protected .zip files. You’ll need to first download the .zip file to your computer. Then to unzip the file you’ll need Winzip or a fully compatible alternative software. You’ll also need the password which you can obtain at no cost by contacting us and explaining briefly what your interest is.

The REM Island – August 1972

REM Island was a marine platform originally located in international waters about six miles off the Dutch coast near Noordwijk and anchored to the sea-bed. The REM island‘s purpose was for offshore “pirate” radio and TV broadcasting by Radio & TV Noordzee which had been founded a year earler, in 1963.

REM is an acronym, standing for Reclame Exploitatie Maatschappij, which means advertising exploitation company. Commercial broadcasts aimed at the Dutch market commenced in mid August 1964 with a radio programme on 1400kHz and TV using Channel E11 (System B).

The Dutch authorities took action against the station by passing the REM Law on 12th December 1964, which designated the sea bed under the REM Island as Dutch territory. Five days later Dutch authorities boarded the platform and ended broadcasting. About one year later, Radio Noordzee resumed transmissions legally, on land, as the TROS.

Meantime the REM Island itself was abandoned and was for some time used by the Dutch government to measure sea temperature and salt concentrations. In 2004, after a failed attempt to sell the REM, it was eventually dismantled in 2006.

Since March 2011 the REM platform has been located in the harbour of Amsterdam and serves as a restaurant.

More information about the REM island is available here and here.

Pictures of the abandoned REM island shown below were taken by Fred Bunzl during a sight-seeing boat trip in August 1972.


All photos © Fred Bunzl

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